Links suggested by my tutor in Part 2 feedback

25 February 2017

 

In her review of Assignment 2, my tutor made suggestions of artists and designers whose work was relevant to my interest in configurable artworks, constructed textiles and 3D structures.

I started by looking at the mobiles of Alexander Calder (Tate, n.d.) I could see the relationship with some of my samples joined with brass fasteners in particular Project 1, exercise 5, sample 10 (see below).

Three.jpg

It’s not that the piece closely resembles Calder’s mobiles in shape, or colour, rather that it shares a feeling of precarious poise and balance. There is a feeling that the piece might be transient, and that it could be disturbed by the breeze.

Other links were also concerned with configurable surfaces (Strozyk, 2013-16), (Smith, 2014a). Of these, I was particularly taken with a video of Martin Smith’s Rainbow (Smith, 2014b). The piece consists of a series of seven stainless steel frames, each of which is motorised and orientates at varying angles. Each of the panels contains many small coloured aluminium squares which flutter in response to air currents and create natural rhythms of movement across their surface. Although bold rainbow-colours, the piece also seems to emulate leaves on a tree through it’s movement. Because the aluminium pieces are shiny, there is reflection too, depending at what angle the light catches them. It reminds me of the play of light over the surface of water. This is a gentle piece which has a lot in common with the natural world.

The examples of constructed textiles and 3D structure chosen for me to look at included dynamic woven/gathered textiles (Pleun, n.d.), 3D lattices (Gwillim, n.d.a.), raised surfaces (Gwillim, n.d.b.) and the varied deconstruction, disrupt, reverse, reinvent ethos of the Envisions group (Schuurman, n.d.).

Gwillim’s 3D lattices (“systems” series) very much reminded me of Project 1, exercise 3, sample 3 (below).

Mult.jpg

His work made me consider that I could develop my samples in a similar way, by stacking them together to make a 3D shape. I also liked the way that the final piece of his “flow” series incorporated cut-outs, or “windows”, so that the raised surfaces was only revealed selected areas (Gwillim, n.d.b.) 

The endearing feature which appeals to me about all of these pieces is geometry. Suggesting process and conformity, it provide structure and pattern, however, I also feel that there is scope for it to be explored as a contrast to less will controlled elements, such as a loosely scribbled pattern. I will be considering these ideas as I go forward in this course and my textile practice.

 

References:

Gwillim, S. (n.d.a) Flow. At: http://skyegwillim.com/project1.html# (Accessed 2 March 2017)

Gwillim, S. (n.d.b.) Systems. At: http://skyegwillim.com/project2.html# (Accessed 2 March 2017)

Pleun, R. (n.d.) Structured textiles. At: http://www.robinpleun.com/#/structured-textiles/ (Accessed 2 March 2017)

Smith, M. (2014a) Rainbow (2014) At: http://www.smithautomata.co.uk/rainbow.html (Accessed 2 March 2017)

Smith, M. (2014b) Rainbow. [user generated content] Creat. Martin Smith. At: https://m.youtube.com/watch?ebc=ANyPxKr9sERWhnvPxWnLBrv0yTcwWja5Qsmbl2Jrn65WMOM2EF1XsYgIazq2uKtj3kkPYW3ZP_nrktCg7cp4M11jMr9MdY3x6Q&v=xZJEJYfhOIw(Accessed 7 March 2017)

Schuurman, S. (n.d.) Envisions group. At: http://sanneschuurman.com/portfolio_page/envisions (Accessed 2 March 2017)

Strozyk, E. (2013-16) Wooden carpet (2010) At: http://www.elisastrozyk.de/seite/woodencarpet.html (Accessed 2 March 2017)

Tate (n.d.) Art and artists: Alexander Calder, mobile c 1932. At: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/calder-mobile-l01686 (Accessed 2 March 2017)

 

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